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Munin
Wolves

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Petroglyph




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About

Two headed horse


"I counsel thee, Stray-Singer, accept my counsels,
they will be thy boon if thou obey'st them,
they will work thy weal if thou win'st them:
hold never in scorn the hoary singer;
oft the counsel of the old is good;
come words of wisdom from the withered lips
of him left to hang among hides,
to rock with the rennets
and swing with the skins."

Håvamål   133
The Counseling of the Stray-Singer

Ship petroglyph

The Keel Building Picture Gallery





Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Leif Arne Planing

The first task was to start cleaning up the keel timbers. Arne and Leif got going with the power planer.

© Copyright 2000 Peter Jensen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Les Grinding

For some fast removal of rough spots, Les fired up the angle grinder.

© Copyright 2000 Peter Jensen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Kris Transferring Pattern

Little by little, the templates were ready. Kris laid out the templates as the timbers were clean enough to show a decent penciled cut line.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Arne Cutting Keel

Cutting four inch keel stock posed some challenges as we did not have a band saw. The skill saw couldn't cut all the way through, so Arne improvised by making a cut from each side.

© Copyright 2000 Peter Jensen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Arne Hand Sawing

Power tools are great, but sometimes hand tools are just the ticket. For tight spots, Arne brought out "Old Faithful", a trusted hand saw.

© Copyright 2000 Peter Jensen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Arne Plugging Holes

The down side of using recycled beams was the presence of a large number of nail holes.

Arne showed up with a load of whittled down sprigs and set about plugging everything. With a dollop of glue applied, the plug was driven home and later ground off flush. Worked like a charm.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Uneven Keel

Oh horrors. An uneven keel! The double cuts with the skill saw didn't always meet dead on, so some clean up work was required.

© Copyright 2000 Peter Jensen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Planer on Keel

Here's how that was taken care of. I like this picture, it has nerve catching like it does the tool so casually left on the work piece awaiting the builder's return.

© Copyright 2000 Peter Jensen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Arne Squaring Up

Here's Arne squaring up a piece. You can see his carpenter's square hanging over the side. We didn't really need a lot of tools to shape the keel pieces.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - First Keel Piece

And here it is, our first keel piece ready and waiting.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - A Stem Piece

The main section of the keel was mostly straight cuts and no curves. That sure changed when we got to the stem and stern pieces. Here the curves ruled.

It was really quite amazing to see how all the curves were cut smoothly by free hand using only the skill saw.

© Copyright 2000 Peter Jensen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Small Keel Piece

Some of the keel pieces looked a little strange to those of us inexperienced in the fine art of keel construction. We had to go look at the lines on the floor and the templates to figure out where this one fit in.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Small Keel Piece 2

Another strange looking item. With a little imagination it's possible to see how this could fit together with some of the other, larger pieces.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Wedge

This one, however, definitely looked a little out of place.

The explanation was simply that the stem and stern curves are not identical. Given the width of our beams, we were restricted in the kinds of curves we could build with straight pieces. We had to resort to this wedge shaped piece to complete the stem.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Assembling The Keel

Then the big day arrived. We could begin laying out the keel fitting each individual piece to its rightful neighbours.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Stem Curve

In the late afternoon, the sun drew shadow patterns with the roof battens and trusses. Quite pretty, really. Made us all a little lazy and contented. I enjoyed walking around by myself after everyone had left trying to capture this special moment on film.

The light and shadows make the joints a little hard to spot, but if you look closely, you can see which pieces go where.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Closeup of Stem

This is a closer look at the stem with the funny little wedge piece. The keel pieces are just pushed together at this point, no bolts have been put in yet.

Can you make out the joints? Pretty accurate joinery, don't you think?

The team really did a marvelous job.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Centre Keel Section

The centre keel section seemed to just go on forever loosing itself in the shadows becoming one with the building.

There's a zen-like aura over the whole tableau. Reminiscent of a Japanese monastery.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Centre Keel Section

There is the joint in the centre section and then the keel flows right into blackness.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Stern Curve

The light is playing tricks with me. Moving around creates new relationships between sun and structures. A little light sneaks in and suddenly we can see the stern section and the two joints.

The prominent notch at the lower joint is there in wait for the keelson. The keelson will be bolted down in top of the keel. Later. Not today.

I didn't take anymore pictures. Just sat for a moment. Ran my hand along the keel smelling the wood while the waning sun warmed the back of my neck. Nice.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Trim Fit

Now the detail fitting begins, joint by joint. Arne squares up two abutting surfaces with the angle grinder while Mike steadies the piece.

Sawdust is flying everywhere and is getting in Mike's eyes.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Final Fit

The final trimming for a really close fitting joint is done with the pieces clamped together while Kris works a hand saw down the joints in the notched part.

The keel just seemed to flow together with incredible precision. It was a treat to watch.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Tarring Joints

Arne is tarring the joint surfaces before clamping everything together. Tar has been in use for a very long time. It was the most common wood preservative known to the Vikings.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Clamped Joint

The keel is beginning to shape up. Clamps in place, the crew is off fetching drills and other stuff.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Counter Sinking

While Kris positions the bolt, Arne runs in the spade bit to counter sink the bolt head. Later, the hole will be plugged sealing off the bolt.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Drilling Bolt Hole

Free hand drilling of long holes in heavy stock takes two people and concentration.

Kris spots against his big straight edge laid across the keel while Arne watches the horizontal hold.

As long as you don't rush it, you'll be fine.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Caulked Bolt

Before running in the bolt through the keel, Kris wrapped some cotton around it. This caulking will prevent water from seeping in through the bolt holes. Such a simple thing once you're aware of it.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Tightening the Nut

The last step is to tighten the nut over a washer and we're done. With number one, that is. We had seven pieces with six joints to do.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Bolted Together

Finally, the last bolt was tightened and we had a solid keel assembly.

I enjoyed walking the length of the keel examining the joints trying to imagine what it would look like in the water.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Keel Ready

A final look at the keel in all its grandeur. At long last we were ready for the keel raising ceremony.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Keelson

After the keel raising ceremony, we could return to our building tasks again. The next step was to make the keelson.

Like the keel itself, the keelson is also a two piece structure.

The keelson is beveled on the sides with a taper at stem and stern.

The black, tarred notch on the keel in he background shows where the keelson will fit.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Station Molds

Here are two station molds or temporary frames. We will use nine stations to guide the layup of the hull planking.

Each station is different as it traces out a cross section of the hull and the hull itself is not symmetrical.

© Copyright 2000 Peter Jensen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Keel Stem Rabbet

Before the station molds could be put in place, we had to get the rabbets cut in the stem and stern. Since we'd be putting up battens - one for each strake - there would be no room to do this later.

Kris laid out the lines and then we had to watch the angles of the rabbet to ensure that the planking would fit snug and flush with the stem and stern timbers.

© Copyright 2000 Peter Jensen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Keel Stem Rabbet2

The stem and stern rabbets flow into the keel rabbet at the keelson. Here Jim is working on the last little stretch to get a perfect match.

© Copyright 2000 Marian Toft






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Keelson

Here is a close up of the keelson showing the beveled underside flush with a top bevel on the keel timbers. You can also see one of the bolts holding the keelson in place.

This combination provides a large surface to lay the garboard (first strake) against. There's lots of timber to take the boat nails and resist undue movements to loosen the garboard once the ship is at sea.

© Copyright 2000 Peter Jensen






Digital Norseman: BCVSP Pictures - Our Ship in Being

And suddenly it's not about bits and pieces anymore. With the station molds in place, we can see the shape of our Viking Ship, our ship in being.

© Copyright 2000 Preben Ormen

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